Do you trust Apple?


fileunderFound in iPod
Sort by: Oldest  •  Newest  •  User
«Prev 1 2 Next»
moderator
view 
avatar

Simple enough question.

Do you think Apple is really looking after the customer? Their hardware policies are irritating, but they've made understandable excuses about contracts with other companies (read: record labels and AT&T).

As a consumer, do you trust Apple with your digital rights?

admin
view 
avatar

I don't like buying Apple products for the simple reason that in 3-6 months, the object will have been replaced by a better alternative. This forces me to constantly wait for new updates...ensuring I never actually buy anything. I found the whole iPhone thing ridiculous (huge price drop after 2 months) and the forced iTunes usage extremely annoying. So I don't know if the word is trust so much as finding the company extremely annoying.

moderator
view 
avatar

I'm fine with using iTunes- though it is limiting on my Eee. My desktop is a Mac Mini, so there is no real limitations for me there.

But I just don't see the point of your arguement. Well, the iPhone bit is bloody obvious. That sucked for early adopters. But Apple is known for their refresh cycle, 6-9 months on pretty much everything. Honestly, props to them for it. It keeps all of their hardware competitive.

I don't think Apple locks their iPods purely for consumer friendliness. It makes everything really easy for us to set up, and for them to program, but it also makes it very easy for DRM rights violations to occur. IE, Apple suddenly deciding to not let you play some song on your iPod.

Apple's track record suggests that they are working to free their media from DRM. iTunes works great with most media players, as long as all your media is DRM-free. So if Apple could drop the DRM, we would have a peach situation. I could use whatever PMP I want, and I don't have to deal with shitty Microsoft/Creative/iRiver software.

admin
view 
avatar

I've been anti-Apple lately, and it's mostly been a set of recent events surround their business practice of enticing consumers with great hardware, then locking them into proprietary technologies where they make even more money.

Here's are some things they've done that I'm not happy about:

1) Apple iPhone: a) not open to third-party development and apps, b) exclusive arrangement with AT&T, c) offer it initially at a high price for the early adopters, then drop the price by a $100 only a few months later.

2) Apple iPod line: a) focused on sizzle rather than the steak. A whole bunch of companies have snuck in and offered better products, b) proprietary iTunes, and limited file format capabilities.

3) Apple iMac, Macbook, Macbook Pro: these machines are overpriced. They Macs used to offer a great product with a much better screen and user experience out of the box, but now, with cheaper software and the whole open-source Linux movement, you can get comparable computers for much cheaper.

I think Apple has pushed the limits of being perceived as the cool, hip, underdog. When I watch those Mac vs. PC commercials, I can't help but like the PC guy a lot better than the Mac guy. Secondly, it seems like the world has zigged, and they've zagged. Open-source, open-APIs, open-standards, are the order of the day, and Apple seems more closed than ever.

I'm still waiting for Android.

moderator
view 
avatar

Apple is releasing an SDK for the iPhone/iPod touch, however I haven't heard much about it lately. The original report is that it's due next month. It shouldn't be taking them this long because the SDK was needed to write the original software for the iPhone. I understand they need to tweak a few things so that you don't completely screw up you iPod, but still Apple did announce this in October. 

admin
view 
avatar

I think they'll announce the SDK at MacWorld which is being held Jan 15th. Alongside the announcement of the 2nd Gen iPhone.

And in regards to the OP I'd have to say that I trust them as much as any other company, no more or less. I do appreciate their cohesiveness which makes things simpler, but after using my Eee for the past while the openness has been so cool. I'm just glad that both options exist :)

Let companies like Apple have their closed systems that are high on innovation and lead the way. Then let the Open Source community come along and do their copy-cat products that are a little rougher around the edges, but build upon the groundwork in a big way.

moderator
view 
avatar

Remember that a lot of the features in OS X were originally open source projects...

Widgets are the most apparent example.

But I'm glad you mentioned the bit about choice. My Eee always makes me happy in that I have complete control over it, and Asus has made no attempt to control the way it's used.

admin
view 
avatar

OSX itself is built on Unix. So they definitely leveraged a lot of technology and innovation from the Open Source community and have they really given much back? You could almost say they're worse than Microsoft in that regard because at least Microsoft is consistently proprietary! The nice thing about Microsoft as well is that you don't really NEED to trust them, since you can hack everything up anyway. A lot of Mac applications haven't been hacked yet, so you really do need to trust Apple. Will they take care of you in the long run, or will they let people take care of you?

The most notable example I can look at is with content streaming to the Xbox 360. I have a lot of content in my computer, a Windows XP machine. To stream content to my 360 from XP I have about 5 options available to me, most of them free. Even Linux has a couple of free options. However, on the Mac from what I know, there's only 1 option and it costs money. Of course you COULD go with an Apple device, like the Apple TV but you start getting into the all Apple world. Which is fine if you're a Mac fanboy like a couple of my friends. Personally, I like using the best device in each particular niche, and Apple isn't that for everything, therefore the ability to mix and match is very important to me. So far, Apple hasn't been very good with that. For now, I'm staying away from owning Apple products, but I like using them, and I look to my friends with a little bit of envy.

The awesomeness of the Eee hit home this weekend when I geeked around with it and ended up messing up some programs. After searching around on the web a bit I discovered that it has a built-in "restore to factory defaults" functionality that is stupid-easy to trigger. Which is great, because I can do whatever the heck I want to the Eee (from a software perspective) and I'll always be able to restore it to a working state in about 2 minutes. I don't need to spend a day reinstalling the operating system and applications. That's so friggin sweet.

moderator
view 
avatar

I don't trust Apple and I hate iTunes.   I will leave it at that.

member
view 
avatar

Yeah, I'm not a fan of too many apple products. The iPod is generally pretty slick, but as above, there are other options available that are as good if not better. I'm not a big cellphone person, and haven't found much appealing in the iPhone.

I would probably buy a MacBook Pro, as they seem to be great laptops. But as far as my home PCs are concerned I preffer being able to mix and match.

I'd say I trust apple less then I trust google, and I don't really trust google all that much. I think as far as big business goes they are well up there in trustworthiness, but far from beyond reproach.

Post Reply:

File Under: